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Lauren Layne is the USA Today
Bestselling
author of contemporary romance.

 

Prior to becoming an author, Lauren
worked
in e-commerce and web-marketing. In 2011, she and her husband moved from
Seattle
to New York City, where Lauren decided to pursue a full-time writing
career.
It took six months to get her first book deal (despite ardent
assurances
to her husband that it would only take three). Since then, Lauren’s
gone
on to publish ten books, including the bestselling Stiletto series, with
several
more on the way in 2015.

 


Lauren currently
lives in Chicago with her husband and spoiled
Pomeranian.
When not writing, you’ll find her at happy hour, running at a
doggedly
slow pace, or trying to straighten her naturally curly hair.

 
 

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INTERVIEW





1) What is the first book you read
that comes to mind? Why is it so important to
you?
 



Perfect by Judith McNaught. Man, does
that woman ever know how to rip your heart out, and Perfect’s my absolute
favorite. In fact, I’m embarrassed to admit that my first couple writing
attempts were trying to mimic her style, until I realized that I’m more about
fun banter than I am angsty-drama. But I can remember exactly where I was when I
read Perfect. The first time. The second time. The third time. Whenever I think
back on it, I remember that romance really isn’t about the title or the cover or
the sales numbers—it how it makes readers feel. I think that’s the most
important thing a writer can focus on!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2) How much of you and/or your
surroundings is a part of your stories? Is the influence based on a conscious
decision, or do you periodically recognize yourself in one of your characters
and it wasn’t
planned?

 



I rarely pull elements from my own
life into my books. Oddly enough, when I *do* make a conscious decision to do
so, those are usually the spots where readers criticize the character as the
plot twist as being unlikable. Ha. Ouch! Although honestly, I’m okay with this
feedback. I’d much rather depict situations that are real (I know they’re real,
because I’ve seen them happen) than try to manufacture something just to please
someone. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


3) If you had the chance to
influence the questions people ask you in interviews, what question is the most
annoying and you would love to never hear again? What question would you really
like to answer that you have not been asked yet, and what is your answer to that
question?
 



Haha, I was actually just discussing
this with an author friend yesterday! One question that exhausts us is “Tell us
X things about yourself that nobody knows.” Honestly, I didn’t have that many
secrets in the first place, and the ones I do have are all exposed now, because
so many people ask the question 😉 As far as what people don’t ask — I wish
more people would ask “why should I read this book?” Our books are so dear to us
authors, and we’re always dying to tell you why we love a particular story so
much. In the case of Blurred Lines, I’d say that I want readers to read this
book, because it’s fun. Pure and simple. Fluffy in the same way a romantic
comedy released on Valentine’s Day might be. And I’m just fine with that
🙂 
 
 
 
 


4) Name three characteristics of your writing style
that are important yet different from other
authors.
 



Hmm, I’ve only got 2
Concise | Most of my author friends
have to work with their editors to trim word count, but I always have the
opposite problem. My editors and I are always trying to figure out how to build
upon my rather short writing style
Take Me As I Am | What I mean is, I
have talk to a lot of authors who struggle with how to make their characters
more likable. I don’t really worry about that much — I focus more on “is this
action true to this character.” i.e., I let my younger characters make mistakes.
Big ones. I make my stubborn characters, well, stubborn. The uptight ones aren’t
going to be come less uptight just because you want them to be more popular
🙂 
 
 
 
 
 


 
5) What do you want tell your
readers at the end of this
interview?
 



To consider easing up a bit on heroines — lately I’ve been
encountering so many book reviews (of my own books and others) where the heroes
can act like complete jerks, and we call it “alpha” or “hot,” but if a heroine
makes a mistake, she’s pretty much dead to the reader. I’d love to chip away at
that double standard 🙂

Merken