AUTHOR INTERVIEWS

AUTHOR INTERVIEW BOOKPROMO

INTERVIEW – C.L. Parker Author of “Getting Rough”

 
 
Title : Getting Rough 
Author :C.L. Parker
Series : Monkey Business Trio #2
Release date: January 26th 2016
Rating :  4 Stars
 
Hotshot San Diego sports agent Shaw Matthews and his sexy professional adversary Cassidy Whalen have gone head-to-head in the boardroom—and the bedroom. Now Shaw has scored a big promotion—but only because Cassidy turned it down and ran off. There are many things he wants when it comes to Cassidy—just not her pity. So Shaw rushes to a small town in Maine to retrieve his dignity—and maybe the woman he’s hungry to claim once more. Cassidy has pushed herself to the max to realize her career dreams—until a family crisis brings her home. But Shaw isn’t letting Cassidy go that easily. Neither is gorgeous heartthrob Casey Michaels, the childhood sweetheart she left behind—and who now wants to win her back. As the rivalry between the two alpha males intensifies, and Shaw’s seductive moves reach a whole new level of heat, Cassidy has to make a choice. And this time, it’s for the highest stakes of all.
 

 

 
 
 
 

 

What made you start writing books? 
 
I suppose my imagination was
too big to keep inside. I’d never had an urge to write; I was simply
creative, I suppose. While riding along in a car with my sister, we’d
see a couple in the car next to us and I’d make up an entire story about
where they’d been and where they were going, what was happening in
their lives. My stories were always humorous, and my sister told me I
should be writing screenplays. I’d shrugged that off. But then I read
this book that she’d insisted I give a shot. Twilight. I’m sure there
were just a million groans at that mention since everyone thought they
could be a writer after reading the series. However, what happened with
me was that it made me thirsty for more—more adventure, more romance,
more happily-ever-after. Soon after the books ended, I found a Twilight
fan fiction sight, and my thirst was renewed once more. While reading my
first fan fiction story, I had an idea for one of my own. So I wrote
it. And then I wrote another one, and another, and another, and one
more. The feedback I was getting on those stories was very encouraging.
The next thing I knew, I was being published. 
 
How much of you
and/or your surroundings is a part of your stories?
 
 
Lots! I don’t see
how it’s possible that our surroundings aren’t absorbed into the story.
After all, writers write what they know. 
 
Is the influence based on a
conscious decision, or do you periodically recognize yourself in one of
your characters and it wasn’t planned? 
 
I think both. Again, I write what
I know. However, I’ve learned that writing is therapeutic for me. Often
times I write a character’s dilemma and then the resolution is
eventually revealed. It’s then that I sit back and think, “Huh, I’ve
just solved my own issue.” They say it’s easier to see resolutions when
you’re on the outside of a situation looking in. My characters might not
have exactly the same issue, but it’s apparent to me that it’s very
similar in so many ways. I suppose I’ve subconsciously worked it out
under the guise of it being someone else’s problem, thus removing the
emotional attachment, of something of the sort. 
 
What author/actor
or musician do you ‘fangirl/fanboy’ over? 
 
Most recently and because of
her Arcana Chronicles series, Kresley Cole. I’m in love with that story
and completely invested. Karen Marie Moning is the cream of the crop for
me, though. She’s the only person I’ve actually gotten sweaty palms
over. Ha! 
 
What does your perfect writing day look like?
 
No
interruption, of course. 
 
Do you plan when and how long you write, or
does it happen without planning? 
 
I’m a tad OCD, and therefore bound to a
schedule. If anything throws a monkey wrench in my day, the writing
isn’t going to happen. I “plan” to write Monday through Friday, from 8
AM through 4 PM, but that doesn’t always happen. I’m getting to the
point that I’m going to have to turn off all phones and social media
alerts, and issue apologies afterward. That, or maybe I should start
working third shift hours while everyone else is fast asleep 😉 
 
What genre is the most intimidating when you think about writing in it? 
Explain why! 
 
Historicals! History was a hard subject for me in school.
Man, you’ve got to get the facts right or your whole story is blown, and
readers will call you out for errors. I live in the present, so do my
characters, but historical romances are beautiful.
 
What do
you like to do when you are not writing? 
 
Read. My life is the bee’s
knees, but I love living in a fantasy world. I will devour a good book,
usually PNR. I’m always looking for suggestions on my next read. 
 
What do
you think your profession would be if you were not an author? 
 
I’ve done
the whole cubicle in an office thing. Though it wasn’t so bad, I really
think my fascination for what makes people tick would lead me into some
sort of therapist career. 
 
 What is the most touching reaction you
have ever received from a fan? 
 
One reader sent me a picture of a tattoo
she’d had put on the top of her foot with an emotional, meaningful line
from one of my books. That’s permanent, you know? So yeah, I was
touched. And so was she, apparently, though her ordeal was much more
painful. 
 
 In your opinion, what is the most important feature a book
needs to have? 
 
Individual character arcs. I feel like each character
needs to have a beginning, middle, and resolution—a reason for their
behavior and a “come to Jesus” moment, if you will. It’s fine for a
couple to meet, overcome obstacles in their way, and then fall in love …
but for the characters to grow individually while also bonding with
their love interest is simply magical and fulfilling. 
 
What is the
most difficult part of writing a book, (including the preparations and
after-publication-process)? 
 
Marketing. The literary community is
drowning in published books, especially with the ease of self-publishing
now. It’s extremely difficult to find a way to make your book stand out
from the rest. You know the readers will love it if they give it a
chance, but getting them to pick it up over another is not an easy thing
to accomplish. 
 
What do you want tell your readers at the end of
this interview? 
 
Of course I want to thank my readers. But what I really
want convey to readers is how important it is that you review books and
talk about your favorite stories to your other reader friends. This is
part of the whole marketing difficulty I mentioned before. There is no
greater marketing tool than word of mouth. Readers pay attention to
reviews. They listen to your opinion and pick up suggested reads from
those they trust. So, please . . . spread the word to anyone who will
listen. You have no idea the impact it will make.
 


C. L. Parker is
a romance author who writes stories that sizzle. She’s a small-town
girl with big-city dreams and enough tenacity to see them come to
fruition. Having been the outgoing sort all her life—which translates to
“she just wouldn’t shut the hell up”—it’s no wonder Parker eventually
turned to writing as a way to let her voice, and those of the people
living inside her head, be heard. She loves hard, laughs until it hurts,
and lives like there’s no tomorrow. In her world, everything truly does
happen for a reason.

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
Connect with C.L. Parker! 
Facebook: FB.com/CLParkerOfficial • Twitter: @theclparker • Blog: cl-parker.blogspot.com  
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Merken

AUTHOR INTERVIEW BOOKPROMO

INTERVIEW – Lis Lucassen Author of “Heat”

 

 


 
 
 
——————————
FULL INTERVIEW for Jeri’s Book Attic
——————————
 
1) What is the first book you read that comes
to mind? Why is it so important to you?
 
The first book that comes to mind is Ugly
Love by Colleen Hoover. I read it not so long ago and was totally blown away by
this heart wrenching story about not one, but two great loves. The way Colleen
Hoover writes her romance stories, is captivating. She handles the big issues
in her book, but in a way that totally mesmerizes you. I think Ugly Love was
the first book to pop up in my mind, because it was one of the books recently
that made me cry and at the same time, made my hart leap because there was so
so much I could learn from that book as a writer.
 
2) What made you start writing books?
 
I always had this secret ambition to write
books. I think as many of us book nerds that can’t go a week without falling in
love with a new story, will recognize, I found that I was surrounded by these
characters and stories that I didn’t read in books, but just happened to live
within my head. When my first daughter was born (I’m a mom of two beautiful
little girls), I thought about the things I found important and one of the
things I would like to give my children, is the believe that they can make
anything happen, if they just believed in themselves and did the work. At that
moment I realized I was sort of a phony, because I secretly wanted to write
down the stories that I lived within my head, but my own fears of failure kept
me from doing the thing I loved. I had to (wo)man up, so to speak. Now, when my
girls are old enough, I can without a doubt tell them to always follow their
dreams like I did with my writing, because when you follow your heart, you know
you’re walking on the right pad and nothing can compare to that feeling that
comes with doing what you love.
 
3) How much of you and/or your surroundings
is a part of your stories? Is the influence based on a conscious decision, or
do you periodically recognize yourself in one of your characters and it wasn’t
planned?
 
I don’t recognize myself in my characters,
but people that know me really well, sometimes come up to me and say things
like: ‘When Dan said this or that, I could totally hear those words coming out
of your mouth.’ So it’s not some conscious decision but I guess every one of my
stories has a little bit of me in them. I like to write about characters that
aren’t perfect (perfect people scare me, if you must know) and that learn from
their mistakes. I think that’s human nature and that’s why people recognize me
and maybe sometimes a little characteristic from themselves in the stories.
 
4) What author/actor or musician do you
‘fangirl/fanboy’ over?
 
O. I have this totally fangirlcrush on
Jennifer Armentrout and more recently on Elle Kennedy and Kristen Callihan. I
love their new adults. I’m totally in love with the whole jock / bad boy / good
guy vibe that’s going on in the books by Kristen and Elle. I binge read their
books (Game On series and Off Campus series) in a week and a halve or so.
And I have this little crush on Michiel
Huisman (the Dutch actor who plays Daario Naharis in Game of Thrones and Chris
Hemsworth when he’s on doing his Thor-thingy.
 
 
5) What does your perfect writing day look
like? Do you plan when and how long you write, or does it happen without
planning?
 
Being a mom of two, I don’t really have the
luxury to plan a full day of writing. It’s more that I sneak some writing time
in when ever the opportunity arises. Mostly, I write in the evenings, lounging
on the couch.
 
6) What genre is the most intimidating when
you think about writing in it? Explain why
!
 
O. Wow. That’s a hard one. I’m a journalist
so I think writing the true stories is the hardest. It’s not your story,
meaning that someone else is trusting you with their story and it’s your job to
capture that person and his or her event or life in the most truest form. You
have to stick to the story that the person is telling you, but you also have to
trust your skills as a write and write the best possible version of the events.
 
7) What do you like to do when you are not
writing? What do you think your profession would be if you were not an author?
 
I like to read when I’m not writing, or
(binge)watch series on tv. I love going to the movies or going out to dinner
with my husband or with friends. I adore my girls and love to spend time with
them. I must have watched Frozen a couple of dozen times by now and lived
through the reenactment of that fairytale more times than a person probably can
stand without losing their minds.
 
Writing isn’t my day job. Yet. I was a public
policy maker for a municipality and I’m a freelance journalist.
 
 
8) What is the most touching reaction you
have ever received from a fan?
 
Somebody wrote in a review of Heat that the
story made them think about their own issues and the way they were dealing with
stuff in their lives. It made them think. I found that touching because the
story reached out to that reader on a level that made them assess their own
life.
Another reader predicted that ‘this new
writer is going places with her writing’. I loved that one as well! I really
hope she’s right.
 
 
9) In your opinion, what is the most
important feature a book needs to have?
 
Conflict!
Every book needs conflict. Without conflict,
there is no story worth reading.
 
10) What is the most difficult part of
writing a book, (including the preparations and after-publication-process)?

 

 

 
For me, it’s the moment you’re almost done.
You’re at about 2/3 of the book and the self doubting begins. Shall I ever
finish this book? Is it going to be the story I hope and think it could be? Or
is this the point to just give up.
Also, I find it hard to start with a story.
It’s like being the new girl in a group of friends. You don’t know the people
you are spending so much time with and investing so much energy in that well
and yet you know that there is something there that makes them special and
worthwhile. It’s that process of getting to know your characters and the story
you are writing, that makes it scary and absolutely amazing at the same time.
 
12)
Name three characteristics of your writing style that are important yet
different from other authors.
 
That’s a difficult one to answer for me, so
I’ll just stick with the things readers say in their reviews and the stuff my
publisher and editor say. Most readers find my writing takes them in to the
story, that the power’s in the details. Some things in the beginning of the
story may seem unimportant, but later on all these pieces of the puzzle fit
together.
For foreign readers (non-Dutch readers) I
think my books reveal a little of the Dutch culture and way of living. The
directness of the Dutch people and their proud way of trying to live their
lives without accepting any help, then realizing there is no shame in asking
for help when you need it most.
And I love layering characters. Nobody’s just
‘good’ or just ‘evil’. Everybody has a story which contains of many many
layers. By peeling back those layers, you can find the true beauty in a person.
 
13) Which of your characters seems to be the
most independent, and has taken on a life of their own?
 
Ha! That would be Steve. You meet him in
Heat, as the very ‘hands on’ and fun colleague of Lynn. But there’s more to
Steve than meets the eye and he was very persistent in telling me his story.
Steve’s not the fun and easy going guy he wants people to believe, there’s a
bitterness inside him and a guilt that’s eating at him.
I’m happy to say Steve’s going to get his own
book, which will be published by Storm Publishers next year (2016). The English
title is going to be ‘High Gear’.
 
14) What do you want tell your readers at the
end of this interview?
 
Well, first of all, thank you very much for
this opportunity and for wanting to interview me! I love the way bloggers and
writers are interacting these days and have the utmost respect for all you
bloggers and readers out there, formulating thorough opinions about books and
helping us writers get better.
I hope readers will enjoy Lynn and Dan’s
story and find themselves wanting to learn more about Steve.

Merken

AUTHOR INTERVIEW BOOKPROMO

INTERVIEW – Holly Blackstone Author of “Step In To The Light”

 

Author Bio

 

Holly was born in New Jersey and moved to the Pacific Northwest at the age of eighteen. She’s always loved writing and expressing herself and scrupulously kept a journal at a young age. She started her first book around the age of nine, although she never completed it, and in high school was co-editor of her school’s literary magazine. She enjoys blogging and writing poetry as well as writing novels and reading. Although an American, Holly is fascinated with British and Scottish
history and culture; this interest is reflected in her choice to often use British spellings for words because she likes them better.
Holly likes exploring how a character’s personality changes and adapts as they are introduced to new experiences that are challenging. She also enjoys creating worlds and tales that are deep and complex that are driven by a solid story, yet have intense erotic elements.Much to her chagrin, Holly has many interests and has a hard time keeping up with them all. She enjoys cooking and has made wine with friends; she likes gardening, drawing, reading, video and board games, dancing, eighties music and yoga, to name a few of her more regular preoccupations.

She welcomes comments and questions at her website: http://www.hollyblackstone.com

1) What is the first book you read that comes to mind? Why is it so important to you?
 
H: I love reading and always would try to find something to read, whether it was a catalog of my mom’s, Reader’s Digest, National Geographic or her Archeology magazine. Probably the earliest ‘reading’ memory I have is of grabbing one of those and finding an article. My parents also didn’t let us read at the supper table, but at the time Kleenex’s ‘Man Size’ tissues had blurbs about America printed on the bottom, my dad kept a box of them at the table and I would periodically sneak a peek at it; I memorized Patrick Henry’s ‘Give me Liberty’ speech from the bottom of a box of tissues!
 
With regard to books specifically, one of the earliest memories I have about them is reading the ‘Chronicles of Narnia’ by C.S. Lewis – I still have the original box set from when I was six or seven. I loved the series because there was depth to them, (from a child’s point of view anyway!); the characters even in retrospect were more complex than you might expect, (for example, Eustance Clarence Scrubb), and some of them made mistakes, (Edmund is the easiest example), and grow from them. The world was rich, the story was interesting, and even though the series eventually dealt with difficult themes, (dying and materialism in the “The Last Battle”), I thought it was done well. I fully appreciate that there are clear religious overtones to the series, and am familiar with Lewis’ life and realise how big a part faith played in it, but it doesn’t detract. There are good lessons children can learn from the series, whilst being entertained simultaneously.
 
Perhaps a year or two later, I began to branch out and read other books that shaped me, particularly “A Night to Remember”, “Blade Runner” and a book about airship disasters, (I’m not joking!). If you’re tempted to think I couldn’t possibly have read those books at the tender age of seven or eight, I should add that I entered Kindergarten at four, knew my alphabet and could read at that time, and I kept a diary for nearly a decade beginning around the age of six. I’ve always loved words.
 
2) What made you start writing books?
 
H: Well, as I said I’ve always loved words, and the concept of ‘a book’ is powerful and frankly, beguiling. At any given moment, hundreds or thousands of people could be – unbeknownst to you – reading something you have created. Words are, (when taken care of), immortal, and can convey powerful and moving ideas about any topic you care to name, and the only barriers are language and access. (When I say language, what I mean is whether or not someone reads the language you’re writing in and access is whether a person can obtain books.) I started my first ‘novel’ at around nine or so, (I believe), presaging the fascination with a post apocalyptic world by decades. I never finished it, and lamented that I ever would. In late grammar school/high school I wrote a fair amount of poetry and short parable-style stories, was on my school’s literary magazine, but didn’t revisit the novel concept until a few years ago, although I’ve continued to read during that time.
 
About four years ago I had an idea for a fantasy story and tried to write it, but was apprehensive about finishing it, and whether it would be any good; I don’t want to write, (pardon my French), shitty books, and frankly, I think I was bogged down in a lot of minutiae, although some of the ideas were good and one in particular was clever.
 
I eventually put it aside until I once more became motivated to write something big; I was away from home managing a project, had my computer with me, and started reading erotica. (I had already read the ‘Sleeping Beauty’ series and other erotica years before.) I read “Fifty Shades of Grey” to see what all the hoopla was about and on the whole I was gobsmacked, but not in a good way. I was shocked at the poor portrayal of BDSM, how immature supposedly adult characters were, (gave it a creepy vibe for me), the sophomoric story and dialogue and how terrible the grammar was, yet it sold. I had some time, was in a small town and had little to do, so I decided to see if I could write an erotica novel and I finished, “An Accidental Affair”, in about two and a half weeks.
 
3) How much of you and/or your surroundings is a part of your stories? Is the influence based on a conscious decision, or do you periodically recognize yourself in one of your characters and it wasn’t planned?
 
H: I consider myself an observer of life and I write what I see and what I know,( to a good degree). I haven’t rescued anyone from a car, nor am I famous, so clearly the reactions of my characters to those events are extrapolations based on other things I have seen, and how I feel the characters I have created would respond.
 
There is at least a little bit of me in all of my, (major), characters, emotionally (as an investment), but also as a human. For example, I put a lot of heart, thought and emotion into trying to construct believable characters on paper, but many of them also contain certain attributes that I feel I have. I have been broken up with a lot, so I possess some of Lily’s relationship insecurity for example, but clearly that’s not all *I* am, and so I wanted to ensure it’s not all you come away with when you think about Lily either – although with regard to the story, it is an important aspect, especially in the beginning.
 
I set the first series in Washington because I love the Pacific Northwest, I live here and it felt good to write about it, to try to bring it alive for people, but when I describe places I haven’t been to, I read about the location to try and represent it faithfully.
 
On the whole then, there is a lot of planned inclusion of familiar themes and locations, but periodically I do re-read something and realise it is more telling or reflects something familiar to me more than I anticipated.
 
4) What author/actor or musician do you ‘fangirl/fanboy’ over?
 
H: This is that most difficult question yet! I actually don’t have a lot of people I fangirl over when I think about it. A long time ago I loved The Police and Def Leppard, and I’ve been periodically obsessed with Big Country and some other bands. When I saw “Man of Steel”, I saw a little of the pull that women felt for Henry Cavill. I guess the CLOSEST to someone I would fangirl over is the model David Gandy , and there is a reason for that. I was writing the Lily series and talking to my boyfriend, (Ray), and describing Stuart; we were waiting for a car to be serviced, and Ray was flipping through a “Men’s Health” magazine as we chatted. He stopped suddenly and said, ‘Is this what Stuart looks like?’, and showed me a picture of David Gandy in a Dolce & Gabbana ad for their Light Blue fragrance. Except for the slicked back hair in the ad, he looked A LOT like what I imagined Stuart to look like, and I’ve seen several pictures since where he looks just about perfect.
 
Now you probably think I am a bloody moron because David Gandy has been around for years; I’m sure I had seen him previously in advertisements but it didn’t click, or subliminally the archetype he represents was working on me, and it fell into place when Ray showed me that photo. As a result, I have a soft spot in my heart for him, and that’s probably as fangirl-y as I would get, although I would be absolutely petrified to meet him.
 
As for the closest author I would fangirl over… I actually sent an email to Sir Martin Gilbert, Winston Churchill’s official biographer because I LOVED “Churchill: A Life” so much. It is an amazing chronicle of the life of one of the greatest men in history and Sir Martin was kind enough to email me back! I couldn’t believe it, and I think I yelled out, “Holy shit, holy shit, he wrote back!”, or something similar and scared the cats. =) I don’t know how Sir Martin managed to keep so many facts and details straight but he did, and it resulted in a masterpiece of writing.
 
5) What does your perfect writing day look like? Do you plan when and how long you write, or does it happen without planning?
 
H: Well, things needs to be attended to in life and I can’t support myself entirely by writing yet, so “the best laid schemes of mice and men gang aft aglay”; as a result, it is difficult to plan a schedule and adhere to it daily, (for me, anyway). At the minimum, I promise myself that I will do at least one writing/book related item a day, (including Saturday), and at maximum, spend a good six hours or so writing.
 
Regrettably, being an author is more than just putting fingers to keyboard, and requires managing your book distribution, engaging in social media, proofreading, answering mail, writing blogs, doing research, etc. Some of it I don’t mind, (like the research bit and interacting with readers personally), whilst some of it – like managing distribution or figuring out how to market – are difficult.
 
An ideal writing day would mean my calendar is pretty clear, and I get to sit down and just WRITE. I actually write very quickly when I can get on a roll because I’m not interrupted and seem to just write faster and faster; this is how I was able to write my first book in just about seventeen days. If I get ‘stuck’, (I don’t usually get writers block, but might need to ruminate on how to work in something to the story), I’ll edit a book, do research or write in one of my other projects until I feel I can go back to my primary book.
 
There are some days where I try to clear everything off the docket as much as I can and devote it to writing, and those are great days! 
 
6) What genre is the most intimidating when you think about writing in it? Explain why!
 
H: LOL. It took me a second and then I realised what it was – (male) gay erotica! I’m not a gay man, and so I would be worried that the fact I have no frame of reference would make the book terrible, that the characters, situations and interactions wouldn’t be believable and would feel forced.
 
7) What do you like to do when you are not writing? What do you think your profession would be if you were not an author?
 
H: Writing is never far from my mind, but when I’m not actively engaged in it, I have a lot of hobbies and interests to keep me busy. Besides my furry quadruped children, (my beloved cats), I love cooking and gardening, (it’s mostly container gardening, unfortunately). I love computers, and computer and board games; I REALLY enjoy art and like oil painting, sketching and watercolouring, and of course I also read. I like yoga, walking and spending time with Ray and my friends, and answering questions from awesome readers. =)
 
As for my alternate profession, I’ve been in the computer industry off and on for years, and I love science and math; my other ‘dream job’ would be working on nuclear rockets with someone like Robert Zubrin and trying to get humans to Mars.
 
8) What is the most touching reaction you have ever received from a fan?
 
H: I’ve been really lucky and I have great readers! There were so many people who were kind when my mom got sick and died – people who emailed/messaged and said, “I’m so sorry – take your time, don’t worry about the book”, to “My mom is in remission, I understand some of the stress of cancer”, or similar comments. I tried to get the last book in ‘The Liliana Batchelor Series’ out before Christmas, but it was a difficult Christmas for a lot of reasons, not least among them because it was the first one since my mom died and also my birthday, so I knew there were no birthday wishes or cards from her any more, and I was depressed. When I mentioned why I couldn’t finish on time, that I was struggling with being sad about it all, I got a lot of support from people who commiserated and reached out; that meant a lot.
 
I had someone from Europe make contact with me, and we’ve become good friends and communicate pretty regularly, despite the time difference, and we’ve even met! I was so surprised that someone would have a strong reaction to something I created, and be moved enough that they wanted to chat; it’s humbling. I also had one reader say she got a reading hangover from one of my books because she stayed up all night reading it!
 
I would love to be able to have a, (monetarily), successful career as a writer, but those moments… when you connect with someone, when you make a friend, when someone is so taken by what you have produced, the words you’ve typed, that they forgo sleep – that is pretty awesome and is incredibly gratifying! It’s difficult to throw your personal creations to the aether for judgment, so when someone takes a moment and says, ‘Hey, I like this!’, it makes you feel good, and takes away some of the apprehension, (for me, anyway!).
 
9) In your opinion, what is the most important feature a book needs to have?
 
H: I need to connect with the characters ; even if they are a bit dark, I don’t want them to be one-dimensional – they need to have depth and complexity. I go back to something I’ve mentioned in my comments and blog – erotica is an amazing genre because the whole of the adult experience is spread out before you, but even though a story has sexual/sensual elements, the remainder of a person should not be ignored. I want to see the sensual side, the parts of a person that are in conflict, that are imperfect and please *show* me some of it, don’t tell me. I am not a huge fan of flashbacks in books for this reason, because you are taking a person who is ostensibly the product of all their life experiences and the character is shown to you, but not the components that made them the way they are, so it can feel as if they are constructed of whole cloth, flimsy, especially if they have some really dramatic behaviour or traits.
 
Books, including erotica, are generally about people and their relationships and interactions with the world, so as far as I am concerned it is vital to make the character breathe for you and the readers. I also want something a little intriguing, I like the character to be a bit unique and not just superficially unique – as in they like seafoam green ; I want who they are to be thought out. When I put down a book, I want to feel as if I’ve had a bittersweet parting from a friend.
 
10) What is the most difficult part of writing a book, (including the preparations and after-publication-process)?
 
H: For me, without a doubt it would be marketing. The fact that Independent publishing has taken off is a mixed blessing in some ways because the barrier for entry is low. What I mean by that is, if you write something, even seventeen pages like some ‘books’, you can get it published pretty easily though any of several venues.
 
This is great, because it means that the big publishers aren’t the gatekeepers any more, and books can be published that might not fit into whatever niche they are chasing after at that point, (sort of the Indie musician idea). The way it ties in with your question is that there are now a LOT more books out in electronic format and it is difficult to get noticed in the sea of published erotica that is out there. I was told by someone who works for a marketing service that reviews are important, but only a tiny percentage of people who read my books publish a review, and the few two-star reviews I’ve received have no explanation, so readers can’t easily judge what it was about the novel that specific reader disliked. You can plop a bunch of money down and try to get a review in Romance Times or Kirkus or Publisher’s Weekly, but we’re talking $400 or more and it’s not certain that you can make that back, or how easily anyway.
 
Also, there is the whole idea of what tack do you take when you present your book to the public; for example, what do you want the cover to look like? I thought I wouldn’t make any money, so the first few covers I made were just photos I took and didn’t spend a great deal of time on them, but when I started to make a little money I invested some of that in buying professional photos.
 
You have to also think about your book summary, keywords and all that – what do you put in the synopsis, what do you reveal, and how do you get someone interested? Keywords I have yet to figure out, so I won’t even go there! But all of that isn’t enough… how does someone stumble across your book in the first place, how do you get the word out and try to distinguish yourself? That is what I am struggling with – how do I reach all those readers that don’t know about my books?
 
I also have three series – one of them is contemporary, the other two are cyberpunk and fantasy. The latter are specific and unusual genres that are not nearly as popular as paranormal, mob, MC, or a dozen other erotica sub-genres, so how do I market those books? Traditional science fiction can have erotic elements in it, and some sword and sorcery has too and both series have interesting stories, so do I focus on the erotica or the genre story aspects more?
 
I probably have gone on in too much detail to try to drive home my frustration – you can write a book, even be told it’s pretty good, but there are still so many people out there who haven’t heard of it and you want to just hit the keyboard and continue to write, but you also have to market. 
 
11) If you had the chance to influence the questions people ask you in interviews, what question is the most annoying and you would love to never hear again? What question would you really like to answer that you have not been asked yet, and what is your answer to that question?
 
H: This is my first interview and you all have been gentle with me since it’s my first time, so I am lucky in that no question has been quite worn out yet, but I will say this: every time I tell someone that I write erotic story driven fiction, people think immediately of “Fifty Shades of Grey”. They ask if my book ‘is like that’, and to me, that’s akin to saying, ‘do you use words in your books?’ On a basic level, books all have something in common – there are words, characters and a setting. Erotica books can vary SO much that it’s a pretty shallow observation to combine all erotica into one pot; it’s such an open ended question that I can’t even begin to adequately parse it. In what way are you trying to draw a comparison? Is there explicit sex? Yes. Is there BDSM? Well, not the ‘BDSM’ portrayed in “Fifty Shades…”, no. Are there heterosexual characters? Is one of them successful? Is it set in America? Do you write in first person? I mean, what is the interrogator really asking? In some ways that question is perhaps more indicative of a stereotype that people have about erotica than anything else, but it still grates a bit. =)Wow, a question I’ve never been asked… so far you’ve been pretty thorough. I guess I am expecting people to ask, “Stuart, book five… what the fuck?!” I should maybe make inroads in addressing that. =)
I know Stuart seems a bit off sometimes… a lot off perhaps. I wanted it to be clear that there were a lot of things going on for him, and he was under a lot of pressure; people under huge stress can say and do things that are surprising. Stuart loves Lily… loves her immensely, but I think it is clear in book five that he takes her and what they have for granted; that he becomes so consumed with everything else that he becomes callous and neglectful when it comes to them. He is so certain he has found his soul mate and that bond is inviolate that he can borrow against it. How often do you hear people using ‘the greater good’ as an excuse for poor behaviour? People use it as a flimsy excuse all the time, and when you learn what Megan accused him of… I was hoping people could see how that would have affected him.
 
When I was writing it, I was trying to think of this; Stuart is clearly capable of deep, abiding love and is protective – you’ve seen it in all the books. Take that emotion and extend it for how he would feel for his child and then CRUSH those emotions the way Megan did; try to strip him of his sense of self decency.
 
Lily has been great for him because their relationship has renewed his faith, but it has also inadvertently brought up things that he has suppressed; because he wants to get rid of the negative things in his life, it is inevitable he will clash with Megan and that will bring up the betrayal, which he conveniently put into a little box and didn’t deal with, and instead surrounded himself with beautiful women and casual sex as distractions. Once he meets Lily and realises their potential, he holds off on making love to her for the first time until she is committed – he doesn’t want to risk himself and be hurt again, and he wants reassurance that Lily is as dedicated to seeing things through as he is. He realises he wants a committed relationship with her, which just dredges up the ghosts of the past and what happened the last time he made that choice.
 
As he tries to expunge Megan once and for all, the bitterness, anger and hurt finally come to the fore – they’ve been suppressed all this time, and have been simmering, which has only made them more powerful and they are so consuming, so painful that it is all he really has room for. Can you imagine realising the person you wanted to share your life with tried to emotionally destroy you, and that you’ve put a lid on it for a year and a half only to have it suddenly erupt in your face because the feelings can’t be contained anymore? I think I have used the term ‘man possessed’ but in this case he is consumed with the need for resolution, for revenge, for closure. I wanted Stuart’s out of character behaviour to be an indicator not of some hidden side, character flaw or something similar, but a barometer for just how deeply and fundamentally he was affected by Megan.
 
We all have dark aspects to us – everyone has their hot buttons, people with calm and composed demeanors can get angry and in book five we saw a limit of Stuart’s. So that’s what happened. =)
 
12) Name three characteristics of your writing style that are important yet different from other authors.
 
H: Well, I generally write in third person present tense which is unusual, especially for erotica.It’s because I prefer third person over first person, and I feel present tense sounds more immediate and interesting. I can appreciate why some people might like first person, and several readers have commented on how my writing is from a nonstandard point of view and how it took getting used to – I realise it can be a barrier for some people because they expect first person.
 
To elaborate further on why I write in third person… there are a few reasons. I don’t enjoy books that switch narrators –I feel if you’re going to do that, you can just write in third person and not have the flow of the book change when you switch to a different PoV, (point of view). Also, a lot of authors don’t try to significantly change the ‘feel’ of the stream of consciousness when switching between two narrators (the H and h). No two people think exactly the same, yet when a book changes from ‘Sue’ to ‘Joey’ both of them think in the same voice, they sound the same, but I’m told it’s now Joey. This doesn’t feel genuine to me, and pulls me out of the narrative. You also do not get the benefit of other character’s reactions, and I feel first person really limits the part that ancillary characters can play in a novel because the focus is solely from one PoV and therefore minimises the role that other actors in the story can play. Present tense was an interesting choice and after a while I decided I really wanted my stories to feel as if they are unfolding in front of you as opposed to the reader getting a revue of stale events.
 
I also write in my own bastardized version of American and British English, which is unique, and perhaps not in a good way! I like some British spellings or terms better, so I’ve adopted them and use them in my writing.
 
It’s also my intention to write erotica that isn’t just about getting to the exciting bits, (pardon the pun! =), but publish novels that tell an interesting story. I want the whole package to be there – hot sex, a compelling story, complex characters and a believable setting and events – I hope that all comes through! I also try to do research on things I am not familiar with so I get the facts correct. While these other elements aren’t perhaps unique, they are not necessarily part and parcel of every erotica book you pick up either.
 
13) Which of your characters seems to be the most independent, and has taken on a life of their own?
 
H: Actually, all of them to a different degree but Lily and Stuart more than any, probably because I’ve written a lot more about them. Sometimes I would write dialogue or a reaction and it wouldn’t sit well and I’d go back because I realised it was out of character; other times I thought perhaps I wasn’t getting enough of their personalities through, or I struggled with slightly exaggerating their reactions and words in order to emphasize a trait they had. This is the curse and joy of writing, especially a series – you may have a good idea in your head about who the players in your story are, but you probably don’t appreciate their full depth and breadth until you put them through the paces and they have some mileage under their belt; at some point I think they come into their own and you feel you’ve hit a bit of a sweet spot when it happens. =) I feel like I’m getting to that point with Julianna (‘The Void Chronicles’ series), and to a slightly lesser degree with Abigail, (‘Sine Qua Non Cycle’), and I’m excited to write more of their tales. =)
 
14) What do you want tell your readers at the end of this interview?
 
H: A few things…
 
First, I appreciate that they spent their money and time on my creations; I’ve been writing a little over two years, I’m not a big name, there are a lot of choices out there, and despite the fact that I’m an Indie nobody, a lot of people, (more than I imagined I would see in my first two years), picked up my books! Thanks for taking a chance on me. =)
 
 
Second, I enjoy interacting with readers, answering questions, and getting to know them, and I look forward to more of that!
 
 
Third, I wanted to give a little preview of my next project; I’m working on the follow-on books in my two remaining series but before they are published, I will complete a standalone paranormal dark erotica novel. Right now it’s at 80,000 words, and I’ll need another 50,000 or so before the first draft is done; I’ll post more details on my site when I am closer to completing it.
 
 
And last, thanks to the lovely bloggers at Jeri’s Book Attic for a chance to chat. =)

Buy Holly Blackstones Books at  Barnes & Noble & Amazon

Merken

AUTHOR INTERVIEW BOOKPROMO

INTERVIEW – Dianne Duvall Author of “Shadows Strike”

 
During the BlogTour for “Shadows Strike” 
we had the chance to ask 
Dianne Duvall a few questions…
 

 

 
Shadows Strike
(Immortal Guardians #6)
by Dianne Duvall
 
Paperback/eBook, 320 pages
Expected publication: August 25th 2015 by Zebra
ISBN 1420129821
 

The Immortal Guardians protect the innocent in secret. Sometimes the secret gets out…

U.S.
law enforcement agent Heather Lane can read minds. But not the future.
The dream of battle and blood that recurs every night must be a fluke,
some obscure terror from her own mind. What its significance might be,
she can’t guess: an attack from seven psychotic vampires at once, only
separated from nightmare by an eighth very different immortal. A
handsome, brave man fighting at her side, a man she misses when she
wakes.

Then the dream comes true. Heather is flung into
a war between predators and protectors of humanity, the man from her
dreams beside her again. Except now that she’s awake, she isn’t sure she
can trust Ethan, or the shadow organization he represents. The U.S.
military doesn’t trust either of them. But against an onslaught of evil
like the one that’s coming, it will take everything they have just to
survive…

 
 
First I would like to say “Thank you Dianne Duvall” ! – Thank you for giving readers of paranormal books a reason to love this genre again. There are so many books out there, that just seem to all copy the same general ideas. However, the Immortal Guardians are different. I know I wrote in my review on “Darkness Dawns” that I was annoyed by all this healthy food, but even back then I knew I would pick up the next book because I felt this series would be different.
 
And it took me quite a while… to be precise until Zach was sitting on that roof with my ever famous Lollipop, that I noticed what you did. You managed to sneak in all those other “Beings” that no one ever would have suspected to find in a Vampire novel. This was an amazing job and I cannot tell you how much I look forward to
reading many more of these novels. 
 
Which brings me to my questions (you have any idea how hard it is to just pick 5 – when I have like at least 10 for each book floating in my mind?)
 
 
 
 

 

 
1) Everybody loves a certain character in a series more than the others. At first I would have said my favorite is Bastien as I am
all in for the reformed bad boy – but I lost my heart to Zach on a rooftop…
If you could choose to BE or MEET one of your characters, whom would you choose to be/meet and why? 
 
 
 
 
 
 
First, thank you for the wonderful introduction!  I’m so thrilled that you’re enjoying the series.  I admit, Bastien are Zach are amongst my favorite characters to write,
because I just never know what’s going to come out of their mouths next.  LOL. 
As for choosing one character I would like to meet . . . 
That’s a tough one.  It’s actually a draw
between Seth and Ami.  Both have seen and experienced sooooo many things.  I could pepper them with questions all day and still want to know more. 
 
 
 
 
2) The Immortal Guardians series is very complex in
details and often refers to events and characters from previous books. I felt
you do an amazing job as I never found any obvious mistakes, so I wonder …how
do you organize your writing ?

 

 
I don’t organize my writing as much as I probably should.  One thing I do, though, to keep events fresh in my mind is listen to the audiobooks periodically.  I know that may sound odd, but I never outline my books, so this helps me keep track of major plot points and the like.  I also tend to skim back through previous manuscripts anytime I’m a little fuzzy on details.  The hardest thing for me to keep track of is the names.  (One of these days I’m going
to make a list.)  In Shadows Strike, for example, I couldn’t remember if Alleck was spelled with one “l” or two, and had to go back through Night Unbound to find it. 
For the scenes in which the local Immortal Guardians and their Seconds gather together at David’s place to discuss strategy or the latest crisis, I make a diagram of the table and mark where each character sits to ensure I keep it straight.  I’ve even made drawings of the mercenary compounds so I would have a clearer picture in my head and keep those handy for future reference.
 
 
 
3) Please tell us a little bit about the fact that this series started as ‘vampire’ novels and developed into something so much more, which includes ‘aliens’/’angels’ and now even ‘ghosts’. Was this a conscious decision that you planned in the beginning or something that kind of evolved as the series progressed? And will we see more of those developments in future? 
 
 
 
 
 
This is something I planned from the beginning.  Both the alien and the ghost appeared in the first book (although Marcus was the only one who saw the ghost).  And I always intended to give each of them their own HEA. I didn’t realize just what a prominent role Ami would play in the
series, however, until the end of the third book.  That was a real game changer.  I also never intended to give any of the Others their own book.  But, again, PHANTOM SHADOWS (book 3) changed my mind when Zach perched on David’s rooftop and accepted the lollipops from Ami.
 
There will be similar developments in the future.  One that has
been floating around in my imagination for some time now may even be so big it could launch a spin-off series. 
J
 
 
4) Is there anything that you can tell us about the future of this series ? (This is the point to reassure your fans that there
will be at least another 10 books!) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
LOL!  I can tell you two things: 
 
1.  Seth’s book, which many readers have requested, is not far down the line now . . . and the big, climactic action scene in it will be a real jaw dropper. 
 
2.  It’s looking more and more like Seth’s book won’t end the series.  It will, however, conclude this particular story arc.  Then the series will move in a new direction.  
 
 
 
 
5) If you had the chance to influence the questions people ask you in interviews, what question is the most annoying and you would
love to never hear again?

What question would you really like to answer that you have not been asked yet, and what is your answer to that question?

 

 
I don’t think I’ve ever been asked a question in an interview that annoyed me.  I do see a question pop up on social media, though, that I always endeavor to avoid answering:  What five books would you want to have with
you if you were stranded on a deserted island. I have about 2,000 books on my keeper shelves.  There is no way I could narrow my favorites down to five. 

 
 
Hmm.  How about —
Question:  Michael Bay is a close, personal friend of mine and is interested in making your Immortal Guardians books into a series of films. Can I give him your number? 
Answer:  Absolutely!!!  You’re my new best friend!
 
LOL.  Seriously, interviewing is not my forte, so no questions are coming to mind.  And I’m always curious to see what questions someone will ask . . . particularly when they have to narrow it down to five.

Thanks so much for the interview!

Merken

AUTHOR INTERVIEW BOOKPROMO

INTERVIEW – Krys Fenner Author of “Punished”

 

 
AUTHOR BIO:
At the age of 16, Krys Fenner fell in love with Psychology and Creative
Writing. At that time she wrote her first short story dealing with sexual abuse
and forgiveness. Psychological issues in her family filled her with the desire
to help others using her own experiences. So in 2004, she earned an Associate of
Arts in Psychology. And while her sister is the one with dreams of becoming a
Psychologist, Krys Fenner returned to Creative Writing. She is currently working
on a Bachelor of Arts and plans to continue on to a Masters degree, where she
can major in her first love (Creative Writing)  and minor in her second
(Psychology).
 

Author Links:

 

 INTERVIEW FOR JERI’S BOOK ATTIC

 

 
 
1) What
made you start writing books? 
 
 
 
I want to change the world through one story at a time. If I get
someone to see things they hadn’t thought about before or let one person know
they are not alone, then I will consider my work a success. I write books that
I believe make a difference.
 
 
 
2) How
much of you and/or your surroundings is a part of your stories? Is the
influence based on a conscious decision, or do you periodically recognize
yourself in one of your characters and it wasn’t planned? 
 
 
 
Some parts of my stories include pieces of my past, things I
have done or lived through. As for the characters, I do on occasion see bits of
myself in them and most of the time it isn’t planned for. Bella’s scholastic
capabilities are based on my own in high school, as well as the bullying, all
of which I intended. However, I see some of myself sometimes in Amanda and that
was completely accidental. 
 
 
 
3) What
author/actor or musician do you ‘fangirl/fanboy’ over?
 
 
 
 
Colleen Hoover. I absolutely love her work!! I read Hopeless and
got hooked instantly. I’ve picked up several of her novels and I look forward
to when she gets her Savannah signing rescheduled!
 
 
 
4) What
does your perfect writing day look like? Do you plan when and how long you
write, or does it happen without planning? 
 
 
 
One, the house would be empty except for me and the animals.
Two, I’d be able to sit at my computer without any distractions. Three, I’d get
in a good three hours or more of writing and accomplish at least one full
chapter, if not more. I’d love to say it happens with planning, but most of the
time it’s usually pure coincidence.
 
 
 
5) What
genre is the most intimidating when you think about writing in it? Explain
why! 
 
 
 
Science-fiction. I’m a little nerdy, but not enough that I
believe I could tweak a science-fiction story into something believable with
words that would convince my readers I know what I’m talking about. My
imagination could easily take me to the sky. Once I got beyond the atmosphere,
I wouldn’t be able to do enough research to describe various buttons for a
flying spaceship.
 
 
 
6) What
do you like to do when you are not writing? What do you think your profession
would be if you were not an author? 
 
 
 
I like reading, not just for personal enjoyment, but it also
lets me see what other authors are doing. I’ll even post reviews to help show
my support. If I weren’t writing, I’d be teaching. It was a profession I
considered doing when I was in high school.
 
 
 
7) In
your opinion, what is the most important feature a book needs to have? 
 
 
 
Believability. Even a fantasy novel needs to convince a reader
that fairies and trolls could exist. If the story fails to show how a model
could fall in love with plain old Jane by letting you see what is truly amazing
about her, then the book is a flop and the reader probably won’t finish it.
 
 
 
8) What
is the most difficult part of writing a book, (including the preparations and
after-publication-process)? 
 
 
 
There really is no easy part to writing a book. Like other
artists, we pour our heart and souls into the words we put on paper. We fall in
love with the characters we create and hate hurting or killing them. Removing a
scene during a revision is awful. For me, the most difficult part is
post-publication. As someone who is not only trying to get their name out
there, but trying to get people to give my work a chance is the hardest part.
Sometimes, it’s simply a waiting game.
 
 
 
9) Name
three characteristics of your writing style that are important yet different
from other authors.  
 
 
 
One, I try to stay as realistic as possible. This means taking
into account the rights of a teenager. A lot of which I don’t think other writers
either want to deal with or glimpse over when writing their novels. Two, I
include a multitude of body shapes, sizes and nationalities. Most of the time I
think we really only see this kind of variety of television. Three, I get into
the nitty-gritty of psychological issues. There are other authors who have
written about these same types, but they dealt with them in the aftermath,
where as I chose to show you the beginning, middle, and end.

 

Merken

AUTHOR INTERVIEW BOOKPROMO

INTERVIEW – Lauren Layne Author of “Blurred Lines”



 

Lauren Layne is the USA Today
Bestselling
author of contemporary romance.

 

Prior to becoming an author, Lauren
worked
in e-commerce and web-marketing. In 2011, she and her husband moved from
Seattle
to New York City, where Lauren decided to pursue a full-time writing
career.
It took six months to get her first book deal (despite ardent
assurances
to her husband that it would only take three). Since then, Lauren’s
gone
on to publish ten books, including the bestselling Stiletto series, with
several
more on the way in 2015.

 


Lauren currently
lives in Chicago with her husband and spoiled
Pomeranian.
When not writing, you’ll find her at happy hour, running at a
doggedly
slow pace, or trying to straighten her naturally curly hair.

 
 

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

INTERVIEW





1) What is the first book you read
that comes to mind? Why is it so important to
you?
 



Perfect by Judith McNaught. Man, does
that woman ever know how to rip your heart out, and Perfect’s my absolute
favorite. In fact, I’m embarrassed to admit that my first couple writing
attempts were trying to mimic her style, until I realized that I’m more about
fun banter than I am angsty-drama. But I can remember exactly where I was when I
read Perfect. The first time. The second time. The third time. Whenever I think
back on it, I remember that romance really isn’t about the title or the cover or
the sales numbers—it how it makes readers feel. I think that’s the most
important thing a writer can focus on!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2) How much of you and/or your
surroundings is a part of your stories? Is the influence based on a conscious
decision, or do you periodically recognize yourself in one of your characters
and it wasn’t
planned?

 



I rarely pull elements from my own
life into my books. Oddly enough, when I *do* make a conscious decision to do
so, those are usually the spots where readers criticize the character as the
plot twist as being unlikable. Ha. Ouch! Although honestly, I’m okay with this
feedback. I’d much rather depict situations that are real (I know they’re real,
because I’ve seen them happen) than try to manufacture something just to please
someone. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


3) If you had the chance to
influence the questions people ask you in interviews, what question is the most
annoying and you would love to never hear again? What question would you really
like to answer that you have not been asked yet, and what is your answer to that
question?
 



Haha, I was actually just discussing
this with an author friend yesterday! One question that exhausts us is “Tell us
X things about yourself that nobody knows.” Honestly, I didn’t have that many
secrets in the first place, and the ones I do have are all exposed now, because
so many people ask the question 😉 As far as what people don’t ask — I wish
more people would ask “why should I read this book?” Our books are so dear to us
authors, and we’re always dying to tell you why we love a particular story so
much. In the case of Blurred Lines, I’d say that I want readers to read this
book, because it’s fun. Pure and simple. Fluffy in the same way a romantic
comedy released on Valentine’s Day might be. And I’m just fine with that
🙂 
 
 
 
 


4) Name three characteristics of your writing style
that are important yet different from other
authors.
 



Hmm, I’ve only got 2
Concise | Most of my author friends
have to work with their editors to trim word count, but I always have the
opposite problem. My editors and I are always trying to figure out how to build
upon my rather short writing style
Take Me As I Am | What I mean is, I
have talk to a lot of authors who struggle with how to make their characters
more likable. I don’t really worry about that much — I focus more on “is this
action true to this character.” i.e., I let my younger characters make mistakes.
Big ones. I make my stubborn characters, well, stubborn. The uptight ones aren’t
going to be come less uptight just because you want them to be more popular
🙂 
 
 
 
 
 


 
5) What do you want tell your
readers at the end of this
interview?
 



To consider easing up a bit on heroines — lately I’ve been
encountering so many book reviews (of my own books and others) where the heroes
can act like complete jerks, and we call it “alpha” or “hot,” but if a heroine
makes a mistake, she’s pretty much dead to the reader. I’d love to chip away at
that double standard 🙂

Merken

AUTHOR INTERVIEW BOOKPROMO

INTERVIEW – Brett Scott Ermilio Author of “The Connolly Affair”


 

 
 

 

 
 
 
1)
Which is the first book you have read that comes to your mind? Why is it so
important to you?  
 
Jack London’s The Call
of the Wild.
2) What made you start writing books?  
 
My
love to tell stories. I honestly can’t resist developing stories and writing.
It is something my mind naturally gravitates to. I honestly wish I would take
more time to read but I constantly challenge myself to write more and more.
3) How much of yourself and/or your surroundings is part of your stories? And
is the influence based on a conscious decision or does it happen from time to
time that you recognize yourself in one of your character without planning it?  
 
Very cool question. I use as much around me
as I can within reason. I am somewhat of a voyeur (the non-creepy kind). I am
highly sensitive to other people’s emotions. It allows me to channel the kind
of energy and feelings another human being, other than myself, could or would,
feel. I would say that my energy often merges with the energy of the characters
I create into one fictionalized symbiotic person. A brief insight into that
would a screenplay I was working on in which the main character starts the
story in the middle of a nervous breakdown. As I began to write that script I
had anxious swells and difficulty balancing life. I stopped writing that script
and shelved it for 3 years. It was that overwhelming. The character literally
got inside my head.
4) Which author/actor/musician makes you start “fangirling” and why?  
 
Ha-ha. I’m going to go with “fanboying” on
this one. I’m hugely appreciative of Mozart, Beethoven, Dave Matthews Band,
Sublime, Blink 182, Pink Floyd and Bon Jovi—yes, Bon Jovi. Their music is
awesome and takes me to other places. So many great musical artists, but I love
the instrumentation and talent they all display. Acting…I’d say Scarlett
Johansson, Jennifer Lawrence, Jennifer Connelly and Emma Stone…Brad Pitt,
George Clooney, Morgan Freeman, Denzel Washington and Sean Connery.
5) How does your perfect writing day look like? Do you plan when and how long do
you write or does it happen without planning? 
 
Ah, I love opening the morning with a few pages. Then I bounce to do
other things and return for some late afternoon writing. Then I enjoy ending
the evening by the computer until winding down to watch TV. I would say all of
this is unplanned. I am a rare breed in that I can just plop in front of the
computer and go. My mind always has a pause button going on a story and I can
just press play and go!
6) Which genre frightens you the most (in reference to writing a book that is
part of the genre)? Explain why!   
 
Horror. I believe there is so much bad
horror out there and it is so easy to look foolish unless you have a brilliant
concept. I rarely give a thumbs up to a horror idea because so few are original
and smart (in my opinion).
7) What do you like to do when you are not writing? What would you probably be
your profession if you were not an author? 
 
Sports!
Movies! Music! If I wasn’t an author (and I could pick), I’d want to be a
musician and a painter. I chose two because I’d be so successful from touring
that I’d have free time to dabble in art (ha-ha). I just started to paint a
little so we’ll see. I’m all about Impressionism.
8) Which was the most touching reaction you ever got from a fan?  
 
They cried hysterically on the phone with
me. I have something I will get around to publishing in the future, but it is
about two brothers, one of who has Downs. It is an extraordinary and touching
story and it drove a grown man to tears with me on the phone as he recounted
the story. It was awkward for me. At the time, I was in my early 20s and he was
in his early 40s.
9) What is the most important thing you need to find in a book?  
 
An effective smart story. I won’t allow
myself not to have one. The story must be great regardless of genre. I put that
upon myself and am very hard on my writing from that standpoint. Because I’ve
written screenplays and TV projects, I have a tremendous background in
developing stories. It definitely helps me as I flush out concepts and ideas.
10) What is the most difficult part of writing a book (including the
preparations and after-work-process)?  
 
I
am a VERY fast writer. I always have been a bulldog when it comes to projects. Because
I work in different worlds of writing (movies, TV and books) it poses a
challenge to slow down and be patient when working on my novels. In addition,
editing is such a challenge for me. I want to move on to more stories and
slowing down and making sure the story I just wrote was perfect is as important
as the first draft itself. So keeping myself in check, preaching patience to my
brain, is my greatest writing challenge.
11) If you could influence the questions people are asking you in interviews…
which question is the most annoying one that you would love to NEVER hear
again? 
 
There are no annoying questions.
I say that honestly. I think the person answering questions needs to be humble
and thankful that someone is interested in hearing their thoughts. No matter
what level of success, it is important to share and let people in. And poor
interviewers can’t possibly know all the repeat questions I get. I say this
now…but I reserve the right 10 years from now to adjust this answer slightly.
🙂12) Which question would you really like to answer that you never got asked
yet? And what is your answer to that question? 
 
What was the moment you realized you wanted to write stories? I’d say
in high school when emotional outpouring hit the pages and I took my first baby
steps toward becoming a writer.
13) Name three characteristics that you feel/think are important in your
writing style.  
 
Visual style of writing.
Creative Metaphors. Challenging my readers.
14) Which character of your books seems to be the most independent one so that
it seems to develop an own life?  
 
The
Taylor Diamond character in The Connolly
Affair
series is definitely a character that has legs and could spur
stories from fans. I think he is dynamic and interesting. I do give the readers
a couple of insert chapters at the end of book 2 in which I call “The Taylor
Diamond Chronicles.” It gives a view into Taylor’s life before he became THE
MAN. It looks at him as a teenager on the cusp of manhood.
15) What do you want tell your readers at the end of this interview?  
 
I’m a very creative passionate writer. I hope
you come along for the ride as I start to show the world the man stories I’ve
been working on since I was a teenager. I’ve lived primarily in the world of
screenplays for a long time but I’m not adapting a lot of works and going to
share some amazing stories with the world. And of course, I want to sincerely
thank the readers for giving my stories their time. I say this with great
humility: I hope I can entertain everyone for a long time to come.



Merken

AUTHOR INTERVIEW BOOKPROMO

INTERVIEW – R.J. Prescott Author of “The Hurricane”

 

About
the author:
 
R.J.
Prescott was born in Cardiff, South Wales and studied law at the University of
Bristol, England. Four weeks before graduation she fell in love, and stayed. Ten
years later she convinced her crazy, wonderful fire fighter husband to move back
to Cardiff where they now live with their two equally crazy sons. Juggling work,
writing and family doesn’t leave a lot of time, but curling up on the sofa with
a cup of tea and a bar of chocolate for family movie night is definitely the
best part of R.J. Prescott’s week. “The Hurricane” is her debut New Adult
Novel.
 
Social Media Links:
 
 
 Jeri’s
Book Attic Q&A

1)
What is the first book you read that comes to mind? Why is it so important to
you?
 
The
first book that comes to mind is ‘The Boy Who Sneaks Through My Bedroom Window’
by Kirsty Moseley. I stayed up until the early hours of the morning and read it
straight through. Afterwards, I went downstairs to make some tea and I remember
thinking about the sort of fortitude a person would have to have to endure the
kind of abuse that Em does and yet have the strength of character to fight for
their happy ever after. Then I thought about how interesting it would be if, in
a story about a boxer, she was as much of a fighter as he was. Out of that ‘The
Hurricane’ was born and it’s been one of my firm favourite books ever since.
 
2)
How much of you and/or your surroundings is a part of your stories? Is the
influence based on a conscious decision, or do you periodically recognize
yourself in one of your characters and it wasn’t planned?
 
It
was definitely a conscious decision to write what I know. Many British authors
have been hugely successful setting their books in other countries like the US.
For me it didn’t work and felt less contrived to give the characters voices and
accents that I hear every day. The characters themselves were influenced in a
much more spontaneous way. It wasn’t until the story was done that I realised
how many traits of friends and acquaintances were in the characters that I’d
written. Without thought, many of the funnier scenes I could relate to my own
experiences.
 
3)
If you had the chance to influence the questions people ask you in interviews,
what question is the most annoying and you would love to never hear again? What
question would you really like to answer that you have not been asked yet, and
what is your answer to that question?
 
I
can’t think of any questions in interviews that have been annoying. Having the
opportunity to answer questions about doing something that I love is a hugely
humbling experience and one I hope I never take for granted. I do get asked a
lot if O’Connell is based on a real person and I always feel sorry to say that
he isn’t. The question I never get asked is ‘God damn whose are those sexy hands
on the cover of The Hurricane?’ to which I would answer my husband’s. When the
cover was first designed, the model wasn’t wearing wraps and I really wanted
these added. So after a great deal of persuasion, I talked him into letting me
take his picture wearing his wraps. They were then lifted off the photo and put
onto cover. Now, every time anyone asks me to sign a book he always points out
that the hands are his. He tells me that he’s thinking of getting them insured.
I have created a monster!   
4)
Name three characteristics of your writing style that are important yet
different from other authors. 
 
I’m
not sure how my style is different from others as I find it really difficult to
compare what I have written with works from different authors. But my writing
process and style definitely has some specific characteristics:
 
1.     Every
word I ever write is completely hand written. I use only black ink and exactly
the same make and size of notebook every time. As soon as one is full I get
going on the next one until it’s done and then I type it up every few
chapters.
 
 
2. 
   
It’s very, very rare that I will get to write in complete peace and
quiet. My notebook comes with me EVERYWHERE and I will write outside my kid’s
school, in the dentist’s waiting room, literally any time inspiration strikes
and I can get a few minutes to put pen to paper.
 
3. 
   
When I write, I picture the storyline as a movie that I see happening
in my head. I think a scene or a conversation through, imagining how it would
look as a film, and try to capture that on paper.
5)
What do you want tell your readers at the end of this
interview?
 
Thank
you so much for taking the trouble to read this interview and if you like sexy,
brooding, possessive, hard arsed Irish men, Cormac ‘the Hurricane’ O’Connell is
definitely for you!

Merken

AUTHOR INTERVIEW BOOKPROMO

INTERVIEW – L.A. Fiore Author of A Glimpse of the Dream

 
 
 
About the Author : 


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L.A. Fiore is the author of several books including: Beautifully Damaged, Beautifully Forgotten and Always and Forever. She’s also the social secretary for her two children, a tamer of ill-mannered cats, the companion to one awesome dog and married to her best friend. She likes her wine red, her shrimp chilled and her social gatherings small and intimate.
 
 
 
 
Jeri’s Book Attic is proud to be able to post an exclusive interview with the author
 
 
 

 

 

1) What is the
first book you read that comes to mind? Why is it so important to you?

 

The Harry Potter
books. I remember waiting for the last book to release in book stores, read the
entire book in less than 12 hours. These books have the ability to take the
reader to another world, one that, at least for me, I found very hard to leave.
What would it be like to ride on the Hogwarts Express?  To receive an owl with your acceptance letter
to the Wizarding school? Seeing Diagon Alley and having your wand select you?
The power of the imagination is a beautiful thing and these books are a
stunning example of that.

 

2) What made you
start writing books?

 

I have always
had stories in my head, characters and plot lines. I’m also a curious person,
often wondering about the people I see on the streets: what’s a day in their
life like? I may not know their specific stories, but I could create stories
for them. I love the imagination, love being able to travel to places I may
never travel in real life, or to create situations I may never experience in
real life. In books, anything is possible.
 

3) How much of
you and/or your surroundings is a part of your stories? Is the influence based
on a conscious decision, or do you periodically recognize yourself in one of
your characters and it wasn’t planned?

 

I don’t
consciously try to incorporate my surroundings or people I know in my books,
but it rubs off. For instance, in Waiting for the One there is a lot of
me in Saffron and there’s a lot of my husband in Trace from Beautifully
Damaged.

 

4) What
author/actor or musician do you ‘fangirl/fanboy’ over?


 

I love Brad
Pitt, he’s mentioned in a few of my stories. 
I also adore OneRepublic and Fallout Boy, both groups’ lyrics are
amazing. And Nora Roberts, I’d probably faint if I ever met her.

 

5) What does
your perfect writing day look like? Do you plan when and how long you write, or
does it happen without planning?

 

When I have a
story in my head, I write until the story is done, so that could be three weeks
of eighteen hour days. A typical writing day consists of getting the kids off
to school, grabbing a cup of coffee and heading to my office with my dog. I’ll
write all day, take a break to feed the family, and usually work until very
late at night.  When I’m not actively
working on a book, I’m usually editing existing books through the various
stages in the process: editing, copy editing, proofing. It isn’t unusual for me
to read the story dozens and dozens of times to ensure the story is being told
how I want it to be told. There are those rare occasions, when I’m not writing,
that I actually have the opportunity to read other authors’ books.

 

6) What genre is
the most intimidating when you think about writing in it? Explain why!

 

Paranormal/ghost/
love story. I’d like to write a ghost story, one based in the Bayou.  I don’t necessarily want horror, I want
suspense and hair-raising, but to find that perfect balance of love story and
paranormal, I think is the challenge because that genre, if not done right, can
come across Scooby Dooish.

 

7) What do you
like to do when you are not writing? What do you think your profession would be
if you were not an author?

 

I love to garden,
mostly perennial gardens with little order and lots of colors. I have done
vegetable gardens but we recently moved and haven’t quite gotten the soil where
we want it. I think if I wasn’t a writer, I’d own a garden center where I could
play all day with plants.

 


8) What is the
most touching reaction you have ever received from a fan?

 

One fan
contacted me to share a photo of a tattoo she had done on her back, spines of
her favorite books tattooed down her spine. 
Beautifully Damaged was one of her books. There are not words to
express what that feels like, to have moved someone so much with my own words
that she permanently marked herself with my book.  Incredible.

 

9) In your
opinion, what is the most important feature a book needs to have?

 

A challenge, whether
that’s love, a job, a stalker, a tragedy, there has to be something that the
hero or heroine needs to conquer, hopefully with the help of others, which
makes them stronger than they were at the start of the story.

 

10) What is the
most difficult part of writing a book, (including the preparations and
after-publication-process)?

 

The waiting. I
can write a book in about three weeks and then the process begins, so by the
time the book actually releases to the public, it can be six months to a year
later.  And sometimes there’s a book that
you just know is the best thing you’ve written and having to wait to see how
it’s received, is nail biting. For me, I love all of my stories.  Beautifully Damaged was my first and I
adore it, Always and Forever is fantastical and Waiting for the One is
quirky and silly. With each book, I grow as a writer though and so my stories I
think also grow. A Glimpse of the Dream, to me, is the best thing I’ve
ever written, may be the best thing I ever write. And I so want it out there,
hope that readers experience the same feelings reading it as I felt writing it.

 

11) If you had
the chance to influence the questions people ask you in interviews, what
question is the most annoying and you would love to never hear again? What question
would you really like to answer that you have not been asked yet, and what is
your answer to that question?

 

I’ve only done a
few interviews, so I haven’t yet had a question that I don’t want to answer. And
though it isn’t a question, I do have a comment. Writing is a passion, authors
write because we have stories to share and though there will be those who like
what we write and those who don’t, it is the relationship between writers and
readers that’s special. For me, I know I wouldn’t have done nearly as well as I
have without the help of readers/bloggers who have taken the time to not just
read one of my stories, but to share what they’ve read with others. So I’d like
to thank Jeri’s Book Attic and all the other readers and bloggers out there
that have a love for books and who have taken the time to share that love.

 

12) Name three
characteristics of your writing style that are important yet different from
other authors.

 

I like to put my
readers through the ringer. I want you to have your HEA but I want you to
experience as many emotions as possible to get there.  I also tend to error on the side of fantasy
over reality. I don’t want the book to be too realistic
though
a vein of reality is important to make the book relatable
—because isn’t that why we read fiction, to escape for just a bit? And I
like my characters all to be flawed because in real life, no one is perfect and
it’s our flaws that make us unique.

 

13) Which of
your characters seems to be the most independent, and has taken on a life of their
own?

 

Kane Doyle, from
A Glimpse of the Dream, because he’s a remarkable character and with all
that he goes through, he stays deep to the bone good.

 


14) What do you
want tell your readers at the end of this interview?

 

It’s a privilege
to write, an honor to share my stories with readers. I’m living my dream and I
wouldn’t be without you, so thank you. And I hope that after you’ve read one of
my books, you’ve cried, you’ve laughed and you’ve lost just a little piece of
yourself in the story.

 
 

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Merken

AUTHOR INTERVIEW BOOKPROMO

INTERVIEW – Clare James Author of Caught

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

<

p style=”text-align: justify;”>About
Clare James:

Clare James writes contemporary romance
and new adult novels with spunky heroines and sexier-than-sin heroes. Her books
have made several best-selling lists including the tender love stories in the
*Impossible Love* series; the steamy romantic comedy *Dirty Little Lies*; and
the touching family drama *Wednesday*. Her new title, *Caught*, is the first in
a series about the women of Elite PR and their very naughty clients. It will be
published with Entangled Publishing’s Brazen line in June 2015.
 
A former dancer, Clare still loves to get
her groove on – mostly to work off her beloved cupcakes and red wine. She lives
in Minneapolis with her two leading men – her husband and young son – and is
always on social media chatting with readers.
 
Connect
with Clare: 
 
Website  |  Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Goodreads

Jeri’s Book Attic is happy that Clare took some time to answer some questions for us

Author Interview at Jeri’s Book Attic.
 

 

 

Thanks for having me today, Jeri! So excited to
be here, now let’s tackle your questions!
 

 

 

1) What is the first book you read that comes
to mind? Why is it so important to you?
 

 

 

Oh boy, I have to think on this one. I loved
Pippi Longstocking books. She had crazy clothes and was fun as hell. I’ve
always loved books about girl power
🙂
 

 

 

2) How much of you and/or your surroundings is
a part of your stories? Is the influence based on a conscious decision, or do
you periodically recognize yourself in one of your characters and it wasn’t
planned?
 

 

 

I think there are pieces that just come through
that you don’t even notice. But mostly, my characters are their own people and
not based on anyone I know. And the same for the plot. Though with Caught, I did tap into my own experience
as a public relations rep. Still, I NEVER had a client like Jarod Cage…bummer.
 

 

 

3) What genre is the most intimidating when you
think about writing in it? Explain why!
 

 

 

Erotic Romance can be intimidating. Whoa, can
it. For me, it can be very raw and vulnerable and it’s tough to go there
sometimes. But, I really love it!
 

 

 

4) In your opinion, what is the most important
feature a book needs to have?
 

 

 

Interesting and unique characters. I often hear
of people complaining about books where the characters don’t do what they think
they should, or they are not nice enough, or not a reliable narrator. To me,
these are my favorite characters. I don’t need to like them, I just need to be
interested in them
J
I also loved to be surprised!
 

 

 

5) If you had the chance to influence the
questions people ask you in interviews, what question is the most annoying and
you would love to never hear again? What question would you really like to
answer that you have not been asked yet, and what is your answer to that
question?
 

 

 

I don’t like being asked about my favorite
books – just because it’s too difficult to answer. I have soooo many books I
love. Plus, I forget a lot of them, and then feel bad when I remember them
after an interview is over!

 

 

Gosh, I can’t think of a question I’d like to
answer. I’d rather just talk to people about books in general—a conversation
rather than an interview. 
 

 

 

6) Name three characteristics of your writing
style that are important yet different from other authors.
 

 

 

*Structure – I always have something funky
going on. Maybe it’s different points of view, or the plot is anchored by some
rules, or part of the story is in a letter or interview, or it’s told
backwards.

 

 

*Smart, strong women—My heroines are always
badass, even if they don’t know it.

 

 

*All over the map with the feels—you’ll get
humor, heart, and heat in all of my stories!
 

 

 

7) Which of your characters seems to be the
most independent, and has taken on a life of their own?
 

 

 

*Stevie Sinclair from DIRTY LITTLE LIES—my
family even refers to Stevie as if she’s a real person
🙂
 

 

 

8) What do you want tell your readers at the
end of this interview?
 

 

 

*Thanks so much for reading my books!! And…talk
to me! I love emails and notes on Twitter and Facebook. Oh, and I have a ton
more going on in 2015, so stay close!!

Merken

Merken

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